thekidshouldseethis:

We just tried this super easy Reversing Arrow Illusion, and it is, in fact, super easy. Draw two left-pointing arrows on a piece of paper and then put a clear, empty glass between you and those arrows. When you pour water into the glass, you’ll see something that you might not expect. How exactly did that happen? From Physics Central

No, you aren’t going crazy and you haven’t found yourself with Alice in Wonderland staring at arrows pointing in opposite directions.  In fact, you have just demonstrated a physics concept called refraction, the bending of light.

When the arrow is moved to a particular distance behind the glass, it looks like it reversed itself. When light passes from one material to another, it can bend or refract. In the experiment that you just completed, light traveled from the air, through the glass, through the water, through the back of the glass, and then back through the air, before hitting the arrow. Anytime that light passes from one medium, or material, into another, it refracts.

Just because light bends when it travels through different materials, doesn’t explain why the arrow reverses itself.  To explain this, you must think about the glass of water as if it is a magnifying glass. When light goes through a magnifying glass the light bends toward the center. Where the light all comes together is called the focal point, but beyond the focal point the image appears to reverse because the light rays that were bent pass each other and the light that was on the right side is now on the left and the left on the right, which makes the arrow appear to be reversed.

Related mind-benders: the amazing T-Rex illusiona basic demonstration of optical cloaking, and from ASAPscience, Can you trust your eyes?

via The Awesomer.

19

March

245 notes

This video was reblogged from monfresh and originally by thekidshouldseethis.

nevver:

Book Brooches

18

March

2,448 notes

This photo was reblogged from nevver and originally by nevver.

17

March

102,597 notes

This photo was reblogged from neweyed-wilderness and originally by zeodora-deactivated20131223.

swamped:

Pipilotti RistGravity Be My Friend, 2007
Audio / Video InstallationEdition of 3 and 1 Artist’s ProofDimensions adaptable

swamped:

Pipilotti Rist
Gravity Be My Friend, 2007

Audio / Video Installation
Edition of 3 and 1 Artist’s Proof
Dimensions adaptable

16

March

1,230 notes

This photo was reblogged from mind--drips and originally by swamped.

rudygodinez:

Prof. Dr, Max Bruckner, Four Plates from the Book “Vielecke und Vielflache”, (1900)

 Regular convex polyhedra, frequently referenced as “Platonic” solids, are featured prominently in the philosophy of Plato, who spoke about them, rather intuitively, in association to the four classical elements (earth, wind, fire, water… plus ether). However, it was Euclid who actually provided a mathematical description of each solid and found the ratio of the diameter of the circumscribed sphere to the length of the edge and argued that there are no further convex polyhedra than those 5: tetrahedron, hexahedron (also known as the cube), octahedron, dodecahedron and icosahedron.

12

March

7,308 notes

This photo was reblogged from rudygodinez and originally by rudygodinez.

(Source: aberrantbeauty)

11

March

4,906 notes

This photo was reblogged from ways-of-seeing-deactivated20140 and originally by aberrantbeauty.

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability occurs when two fluids of differing density are hit by a shock wave. The animation above shows a cylinder of denser gas (white) in still air (black) before being hit with a Mach 1.2 shock wave. The cylinder is quickly accelerated and flattened, with either end spinning up to form the counter-rotating vortices that dominate the instability. As the vortices spin, the fluids along the interface shear against one another, and new, secondary instabilities, like the wave-like Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, form along the edges. The two gases mix quickly. This instability is of especial interest for the application of inertial confinement fusion. During implosion, the shell material surrounding the fuel layer is shock-accelerated; since mixing of the shell and fuel is undesirable, researchers are interested in understanding how to control and prevent the instability. (Image credit: S. Shankar et al.)
The APS Division of Fluid Dynamics conference begins this Sunday in Pittsburgh. I’ll be giving a talk about FYFD Sunday evening at 5:37pm in Rm 306/307. I hope to see some of you there!

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability occurs when two fluids of differing density are hit by a shock wave. The animation above shows a cylinder of denser gas (white) in still air (black) before being hit with a Mach 1.2 shock wave. The cylinder is quickly accelerated and flattened, with either end spinning up to form the counter-rotating vortices that dominate the instability. As the vortices spin, the fluids along the interface shear against one another, and new, secondary instabilities, like the wave-like Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, form along the edges. The two gases mix quickly. This instability is of especial interest for the application of inertial confinement fusion. During implosion, the shell material surrounding the fuel layer is shock-accelerated; since mixing of the shell and fuel is undesirable, researchers are interested in understanding how to control and prevent the instability. (Image credit: S. Shankar et al.)

The APS Division of Fluid Dynamics conference begins this Sunday in Pittsburgh. I’ll be giving a talk about FYFD Sunday evening at 5:37pm in Rm 306/307. I hope to see some of you there!

11

March

2,044 notes

This photo was reblogged from ways-of-seeing-deactivated20140 and originally by fuckyeahfluiddynamics.

(Source: urbanizr)

23

February

69 notes

This photo was reblogged from tiefgang and originally by urbanizr.

myampgoesto11:

Paper installation by Lauren Fensterstock

02

February

4,272 notes

This photo was reblogged from myampgoesto11 and originally by myampgoesto11.

noonewilleverfindmehere:

NO NO NO YOU DON’T UNDERSTAND THIS IS A REALLY FAMOUS ANIMATION FILM TECHNIQUE DONE BY ONE INSANE STUDIO YEARS AND YEARS AGO IN GERMANY, ONLY A FEW FILMS, BECAUSE OF HOW HARD THEY WERE TO MAKE.
EACH AND EVERY FRAME OF THESE MOVIES ARE OIL PAINTINGS ON GLASS.

noonewilleverfindmehere:

NO NO NO YOU DON’T UNDERSTAND THIS IS A REALLY FAMOUS ANIMATION FILM TECHNIQUE DONE BY ONE INSANE STUDIO YEARS AND YEARS AGO IN GERMANY, ONLY A FEW FILMS, BECAUSE OF HOW HARD THEY WERE TO MAKE.

EACH AND EVERY FRAME OF THESE MOVIES ARE OIL PAINTINGS ON GLASS.

(Source: pr0fundum)

02

February

435,911 notes

This photo was reblogged from noonewilleverfindmehere and originally by pr0fundum.