supersonicart:

Greg Klassen.

To make his furniture, artist Greg Klassen collects trees (in a sustainable way, I might mention) from the river bed of the Nooksack River which flows near his home in Lynden, Washington and then transforms them into gorgeous works of art; cutting, carving and sanding them all by hand.  You can see more of the gorgeous work below!

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07

July

2,240 notes

This photo was reblogged from supersonicart and originally by supersonicart.

supersonicart:

Katsumi Hayakawa’s Paper Sculptures.

Artist Katsumi Hayakawa’s meticulous and fantastic, hand made paper sculptures.  See more below!

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07

July

406 notes

This photo was reblogged from supersonicart and originally by supersonicart.

Abyss Table, a stunning coffee table that mimics the depths of the ocean with stacked layers of wood and glass. Made by London-based furniture design company Duffy London.

(Source: mymodernmet.com)

05

July

1,063 notes

This photo was reblogged from themisteletoe and originally by mayahan.

supersonicart:

Ben Young.

Ben Young hand cuts hundreds of panes of glass to create his visually stunning sculptures.  Drawing inspiration from his boyhood in Bay of Plenty, New Zealand the now Sydney, Australia based artist creates mostly scenes of aquatic beauty:

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04

July

2,447 notes

This photo was reblogged from workman and originally by supersonicart.

dribbblepopular:

Septagon Construction 001 Original: http://ift.tt/1x5nm6N

dribbblepopular:

Septagon Construction 001 Original: http://ift.tt/1x5nm6N

04

July

296 notes

This photo was reblogged from modusoperandibunyi and originally by dribbblepopular.

(Source: davidcopithorne)

28

June

2,607 notes

This photo was reblogged from nnaatasha and originally by davidcopithorne.

jedavu:

Columns of Suspended Charcoal Explore Relationship Between Nature and Man by Seoul-based artist Seon Ghi Bahk

23

June

7,567 notes

This photo was reblogged from loveyourchaos and originally by jedavu.

heathwest:

Tomás Saraceno
Poetic Cosmos of the Breath, 2007

22

June

100,333 notes

This photo was reblogged from rightbackforyouuu and originally by heathwest.

eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 

For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.

In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence

17

June

94,850 notes

This photo was reblogged from eleanasound and originally by eleanasound.

ucresearch:

Candles in microgravity
Think about how hot air rises while cooler, denser air sinks.  This all happens due to gravity here on earth, but what would happen without this force of nature?  If the air isn’t rising or sinking around the flame, then how does the air mix to supply fresh oxygen to the candle to keep it burning?  
UC San Diego student, Sam Avery is trying to understand this by taking his team aboard NASA’s Zero-G airplane.  The flight follows a parabolic path and causes a dozen or so 30 second bursts of zero gravity.  During this time Avery can ignite a flame in a special chamber to observe the effects of microgravity.
He led a team last year doing a similar experiment.  During that time the flame was still able to burn, but at a much lower rate.  It was able to get new oxygen to burn by a process known as molecular diffusion.  So, why does it matter? By doing these tests, scientists can better understand a flame’s burn rate and possibly lead to developing more efficient biofuel engines.  
Read more about it here →

ucresearch:

Candles in microgravity


Think about how hot air rises while cooler, denser air sinks.  This all happens due to gravity here on earth, but what would happen without this force of nature?  If the air isn’t rising or sinking around the flame, then how does the air mix to supply fresh oxygen to the candle to keep it burning?  

UC San Diego student, Sam Avery is trying to understand this by taking his team aboard NASA’s Zero-G airplane.  The flight follows a parabolic path and causes a dozen or so 30 second bursts of zero gravity.  During this time Avery can ignite a flame in a special chamber to observe the effects of microgravity.

He led a team last year doing a similar experiment.  During that time the flame was still able to burn, but at a much lower rate.  It was able to get new oxygen to burn by a process known as molecular diffusion.  So, why does it matter? By doing these tests, scientists can better understand a flame’s burn rate and possibly lead to developing more efficient biofuel engines.  

Read more about it here 

16

June

789 notes

This photo was reblogged from nnaatasha and originally by ucresearch.